dev

The Most Common Concurrency Issues and How to Fix Them: Part 3

Jonatan Ivanov

In the first part of the series, I showed you a simple class which has three concurrency issues. In the second one, I explained the first issue: Race Condition. In this post, I would like to explain the rest of them. By the end of the series, you will understand their basic mechanism, you will be able to identify them and I will give you a couple of advice on how to fix them.

I wrote a few tests to demonstrate two of the issues, the third one is tough, please let me know if you have any idea how can it be tested. I’m also interested if you have any ideas for improvements for the existing tests because…
…well, keep reading and you will see. :)

The Most Common Concurrency Issues and How to Fix Them: Part 2

Jonatan Ivanov

In the first part of the series, I showed you a simple class which has three concurrency issues. In this post, I would like to explain the first issue. By the end of the series, you will understand their basic mechanism, you will be able to identify them and I will give you a couple of advice on how to fix them.

The Most Common Concurrency Issues and How to Fix Them: Part 1

Jonatan Ivanov

The goal of this example-driven series of articles is explaining, demonstrating, and testing (the fun part) the two most frequent (in my opinion) concurrency mistakes in Java (plus an interesting third one), also giving you a few suggestions to fix them.

By the end of the series, you will understand their basic mechanism, you will be able to identify them and I will give you a couple of advice on how to fix them.

Terminal Fun: Basic Utils Part 3

Jonatan Ivanov

This is the third post of a series where I want to give some tips and tricks for the Terminal/CLI.
You might want to check out the first and the second posts. As previously, buckle-up, put your helmet on, grab a … frying pan and have fun.

Terminal Fun: Basic Utils Part 2

Jonatan Ivanov

This is the second post of a series where I want to give some tips and tricks for the Terminal/CLI.
In the first post, I showed a few very handy tools like bat, exa, multitail, diff-so-fancy, delta, prettyping and htop/gtop/vtop.
This post is going to be a little longer so buckle-up, put your helmet on, grab a … frying pan and have fun.

Terminal Fun: Basic Utils

Jonatan Ivanov

This is the first post of a series where I want to give tips and trick for the Terminal/CLI, have fun:

  • bat and cat
  • exa and ls
  • multitail and tail
  • diff-so-fancy, delta and git diff
  • prettyping and ping
  • htop/gtop/vtop and top

How to Build a Blog Like This: Content

Jonatan Ivanov

This is the second post of a series, you might want to check the first article (Intro) before reading this.

Hugo is very flexible in terms of configuration and organizing the content, you have a lot of options and you can do things in various ways. This might sound great but if you ask me, I rather like opinionated things where I don’t need to put a bunch of effort in figuring out best practices but the framework gives those to me (Convention over Configuration™). Unfortunately, this is not the case for Hugo.

How to Build a Blog Like This: Intro

Jonatan Ivanov

The whole thing started with: “I think I want to create a blog”. I had a few ones before, those were either all-in-one hosted solutions or self-installed WordPress sites. WordPress was a tempting pick this time (as always) but I’ve played a little with Jekyll and Hugo recently and I liked them. So I negligently threw the red button with the text “Deploy WordPress” back to the shelf and I brought up a little toolbox that has the text JAM Stack on it from my shed (not bikeshed), also I liked the idea of hosting the blog on GitHub Pages.